A Modification

As we reported yesterday, Phase II of TNReady is not so ready. In fact, Grace Tatter reports that the problem is statewide, impacting grades 3-8.

Tatter cites an email from the Department of Education indicating the state is not sure when the Phase II tests will be delivered to districts.

The email also says:

“…Districts may modify their testing schedules as needed, without any prior approval or notice to the (state),”

The thing is, some districts have already been trying to modify their schedules by not giving the test at all. The idea of refusing to administer Phase II surfaced in Murfreesboro in late March and early April. The state responded by issuing a vague threat regarding withholding BEP funds.

Tullahoma City Schools on Monday approved a resolution unanimously calling on the state to cancel testing for the remainder of this year.

All of this was before the realization that Phase II tests would not make it to Tennessee districts on time. Now, though, the Department of Education’s own words suggest that districts may modify as they see fit without consulting the state. One possible modification would be to not administer the test at all. Another would be to schedule it for a time in June when students aren’t in school. Districts could say they offered the test, but no one showed up to take it.

The state has also made a big fuss about what happens to students/districts if students simply refuse to take the test. Trouble is, the state’s memo is based on some pretty fuzzy reasoning.

As this piece was being written, the Department of Education announced it will not ask districts to reschedule tests beyond the current testing window, which expires on May 10th. That means if materials are not received in time for administration by that date, districts don’t have to administer the tests. The Department also indicated it would provide additional flexibility to districts.

From Jason Gonzales:

The Tennessee Department of Education announced to districts Friday it won’t reschedule the TNReady testing window again this year and for those districts that don’t receive tests on time, will provide flexibility.

“We will not ask districts to reschedule again beyond what has been communicated to date, and we will not extend the testing window beyond May 10,” according to a statement sent to districts Friday.

So, what’s next? Will the state cancel the contract with testing vendor Measurement, Inc.? Will Commissioner McQueen assume responsibility for the failed transition to a new test?

Only time will tell, and there’s not much time left.

 

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